Butterbox

AKA, Mt Hay canyon, AKA Rocky Points Ravine

14-04-2018

Dick Madie and me

So it looked like we’d get another warm Autumn Saturday before the cold change was due to roll in so a good oportunity for another wet canyon. A few ideas were floated before Butterbox was settled on, as Julie hadn’t done it for ages and was super keen for a revisit.

Unfortunately She had to pull out last minute and so it was me Dick and Madie who set off fromthe car park amongst laughs and giggles. We spoke to another group in the car park who were leaving just behind us and a tour group was some where ahead of us.

With the other two offering to carry ropes I got to enjoy a relatively light pack. Winning!

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Dick on the first down climb
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Dick on the first Abseil

Madie was keen to show us some alternate ways down various obsticals. Like, instead of down climbing in the creek or abseiling from the side why not slide down this log

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It works.

Butterbox is an interesting creek with a very short canyon section. It’s normally the rock formations, greenery and play of light in the constriction that draws me to a canyon but the sheer amount of adventurous fun that Butterbox offers makes it a trip worthy of repeat visits

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Mind you, while short the main constriction is spectacular.

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We catch up to the group from Eagle Rock Adventures at the top of the main constriction.

2 tricky abseils with very little stance between them mean we are going to have a bit of a wait here.

Let’s do the Slide! Madie busies herself trying to wet down the sloping rock by using her helmet as a bail.

 

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The water isn’t normally that deep here and it looks lower than normal. A few of the clients in the tour group are not quiet sure what to make of it all and I’m sure the guides were wondering what the hell was going on.
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It’s really fun

 

Me and Dick have a couple of goes to amuse ourselves while waiting, it’s bit of an effort to climb back up. Madie must have doen it a dozen times.

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Did I mention the main constriction is spectacular?

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We emerge back into the sunlight with a jump into this stunning pool

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And that’s it for the short constriction. A bit of fun getting too it. Very stunning when you get there and the adventure isn’t over yet as the climb out, usually the most hated part of any canyon trip, holds a bit of adventure to it and is another highlight.

We follow the cliff line up hill and down dale, up and down and up again. But mostly up.

Until we find ourselfves on the halfway ledge. The halfway ledge is a feature found through out the Blue Mountains. A fault where different sandstone layers of the Narrabeen group such as the Banks Wall formation and the Burra Moko formation are separated by a thiner claystone layer, often resulting in a traversable ledge.

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Don’t fall right

Sometimes the ledge disappears, sometimes the claystone erodes in under the top layer of sandstone making for some interesting scrambling.

 

 

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Views like these don’t come cheap

Through the cave and then the ledge ends. Above us the sandstone cliff still towers.

A short rock climb is required to get us to the next ledge up.

photos thanks to Madie, click to enbiggen

and then it’s up a snotty little gully to the ridge line

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it was a tad windy but the views!
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Looking back down into the canyon
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The up hills not finished yet but ther are still smiling

A quick side trip to the top of Butterbox point for even more views and then an easy walk back to the cars.

Another great day in the great outdoors.

Party size 3. All experienced

Time: 6hrs car to car with about 30min mucking around on the slide waiting for the tour group to clear the chock stone abseil, a relaxed lunch, a bit of stuffing around on the climb and a bit of time at the lookouts.

You should be silly and do foolish things, but do them with enthusiasm.

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A wander around some Wollangambe wilderness

08-07-2017

Ed, Etham, Ciaus, Jake and me.

Another trip to this short but pretty dryish canyon out the back of Clarence, and a stop at Goochs Crater on the way back

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This is an awesome sheltered cave. The creek, when it’s running flows through the back of it.
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Venturing up the stuning side canyon. First recorded exploration of this slot by a bushwalking club was a group from Sydney Uni Bush Walking club in 1962, though I suspect Col Oloman would have visited previously either on one of his solo trips or with friends as they explored the areas through here across to the Bungleboori and beyond. Neither bothered to name it.
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I keep forgetting how short this slot is. You get caught up in the light and ambience and time ceases to have meaning
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the large cave in a 180 bend in the canyon.It’s like another world. Ciaus and Ed desided when society falls apart this might be a good place to live
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Ed in one of the more open twists and turns in the very narrow upper section of canyon
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tight and twisting canyon formation
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Ed on the peak, the canyon carves around either side of him. The cave at the bend can be seen in the cliff line, though the scale of it is hiddne by the trees
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We seem to be climbing out to look down on the top of canyons a lot lately
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Ciaus and Jake as the canyon opens out slightly near the cave
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Ed in the canyon
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On our way back out

Then it was over the ridge and out to Goochs Crater

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Ed looking down on the cliff lined swamp known as Gooches crater
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Looking down on Ed and Ethan through the Sky light in Goochs arch
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It’s an interesting feature
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Jake heading over to join Ethan and Ed under the arch
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It really is impressive
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Jake in the well used camp/party cave looking back towards the arch

All in all a pleasant winters day in the bush

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“Life must be lived as play.” – Plato.

Wollangambe Fire trail

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Access: Getting to the carpark involves a dirt road with a few rough bits. Nothing extreme but a 4WD is handy just for the ground clearance and traction

Navigation: Navigation is fairly straight forward.

Map:  Wollangambe  1:25000 These can be purchased at Lithgow Tourist information center or online for around $10

Time: Less than 2hrs with a bit of time for lunch on the clifflines at the end

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View from the end of the fire trail. Mt Banks in the centre distance, Mt Wilson to the left.

Depending on which map you look at or who you talk to this is either the Wollangambe or Dumbano fire trail. Open source and google maps seem to show it as Dumbano fire trail. Wollangambe fire trail is what I always knew it as and makes more sense to me as at the end you lookout over the ‘Gambe just upstream of Wollangambe crater.

Anyhoo, whatever you want to call it, it’s a pleasant stroll with some stunning backdrops.

 

Getting there:

Turn off the Bells Line of road at the ZigZag Railway onto the Newnes Forest rd. Follow this along for around 4.8km and turn off to the right at the bottom of a hill below Bald Trig.

Unfortunitely the start of the fire trail looks a bit like a rubish tip where grubs seem to dump there soft drink bottles and coffee cups… But it gets better.

Set your odeometer here, you want to stay on the main fire trail but there are a couple of intersections where it is easy to take the wrong fork.

At Approximately 1km keep left (right follows the old Wolgan Railway easment around Bald trig to the sand quarry.)

At Approximately 2.5km stay right then at approximately 6.4km stay left. After a little over 8km you will come to the locked gate (GR 499952).

Park up and follow the old road on foot past the gate. The first couple of hundered meters is steep then it is easy going along a flattish ridge for 2km.

Either side of the ridge are sheer sided gullies and at the end of the ridge is a rocky point (GR 505931)  in between where these two tributaries meet the Wollangambe.

This is a nice spot of a bit of lunch (or as we did today cheese on smith chips…) there are some great views with Mt Banks straight ahead, Mt wilson slightly off to the left and Bell out to the right. And the wild Wollangambe can be heard gurgling below.

For the more adventurous this route, with some off track navigation at the end is the shorter way to access the Wollangambe crater which is usually done as a over night bushwalk from Bell. (its not a real crater but a circular depension holding a hanging swamp.  I think it is the reminants of a large billabong type feature made in a sweep of the wollangambe. It sure looks craterish from aerial photos and satelite images though.)

 

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Easy walking along the old fire trail.

Note: The great outdoors is an ever changing place. Bush fires, changing weather, vegetation growth and forestry activities can all effect the trail conditions and thus the difficulty of the walk. These are a rough guide only and are by no means meant to be a definitive guide . They do not replace the need adequate map reading and navigational skills

Note 1: Taking care  While reasonably well known these spots are still wild places and care needs to be taken around cliff edges and on the steep trails.  Carrying the right gear as well as having adequate food, water and clothing is important. Always tell someone where you are going and when you expect to get back.

Emergency beckons (PLBs) can be hired from Katoomba Police for very little.

Note 2: First aid A basic first aid kit is essential bit of kit whenever heading into the Aussie bush. First aid training is highly recommended

Note 3: Maps and Navigation Having the right map, a compass and knowing how to read them is very important when heading into the bush. If you are new to bush walking joining a club or accompanying more experienced walker for you first few outing is a very good idea. I found practicing map reading on well defined trails was helpful when I started out.

The Maps mentioned are the 1:25000 series. They can be purchase at Lithgow tourism information center, from outdoors shops or online for around $10 each.

Note 4: These are wild and beautiful places, respect them. If you are able to carry something in you can carry it out. Don’ be a tosser. Leaving your rubbish behind is a sure way to ruin it for every one else.

 

wollangambe fire trail

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